“Burleigh Narrows”

“Winter merges into spring and water flows everywhere beneath the ice. Small rivulets merge and grow, melting snow and ice along their course; adding to their volume. The cycle begins again.” – Ed Lehming

There is something wonderful that happens in March. The earth begins to stir and water, its lifeblood, begins to flow once more. Staring slowly but swelling with time. It’s a time when evidence of two seasons reminds us of a past and a future as ice and snow yield to water and subtle greenery.

The image I chose for today was made last weekend during a trip to the town of Bancroft, Ontario to deliver some of my photography to a local co-op gallery. It was nice to be on the road and see some familiar scenery again.

One of my favourite place to stop and make photos is Burleigh Falls, a narrows between Lovesick Lake and Stoney Lake in Ontario’s Kawartha Lakes region. It’s a place where Canada’s ancien Canadian Shield is first noticed, where farmland transitions to rugged granite outcrops, majestic white pines, and rivers and lakes.

This photo, which focuses on the narrows below Burleigh Falls captures the essence of the Canadian Shield, showing all the elements that make it so beautiful. There is a raw majesty to this part of the country that I enjoy so much.

Last weekend was also an ideal time to stop here because the shores will soon fill with fishermen and people just wanting a taste of this lovely place.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 24-70 mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 40 mm
1/125 sec, f/20, ISO 400

4 Comments on ““Burleigh Narrows”

  1. Pingback: “Resistance” | Ed Lehming Photography

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